Annual Meeting Webinars

Annual Meeting Webinars

SRA International
Annual Meeting Webinars
October 1 – 2, 2012

Can’t attend SRA’s Annual Meeting this year?
Join us virtually and earn up to 10 hours of educational credit!
SRA will broadcast the following compliance and ethics sessions via Webinars on Monday, October 1, and Tuesday, October 2.

 

Monday, October 1

9:30 – 10:45 AM EASTERN U.S. TIME

Compliance Issues in the Social and Behavioral Sciences
Google Calendar
Content Level: Intermediate
This session focuses on two compliance issues as they affect faculty in the Social Science and Humanities disciplines. Social Science research methodologies can be vastly different than bio-medical research. When research involves human subjects, the research administrator needs to be able to advise faculty correctly regarding protocol submission, informed consent, and other factors based upon the research methodologies they plan to use. The second compliance area is export controls. With the increased emphasis on international collaborations, faculty face export control concerns in the conduct of disseminating scholarship and mentoring and advising students. Research administrators should be able to spot potential concerns to promote a more proactive approach to their management.
Learning Objectives:
1. Explain to their faculty the differences between exempt, expedited and full IRB review and direct faculty to appropriate sources for assistance.
2. Recognize potential export control issues and suggest ways to modify activities to address the concern.
Prerequisites: None
Speaker: Deborah Marshall, CRA, Executive Director for Research Administration, University of Pennsylvania

11:15 AM – 12:30 PM EASTERN U.S. TIME

Regulatory Research for the Research Administration Professional
Google Calendar
Content Level: Basic
You can’t be a research administration professional without reading various types of law. There are many ways to tackle any research problem. When a person is new to legal terms and the types of books and materials in a law library, the research process may seem almost too difficult. The law may even seem like a foreign language to you. This session is a mini-legal research class to show students how to evaluate legal research sources and use them effectively, with particular emphasis on cost-effective research.
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify useful sources for legal research and understand the difference between primary versus secondary sources.
2. Review who produces legal authority and material is organized, published, indexed and kept current. Learn how OHRP/FDA determination letters can be used to solve issues.
Prerequisites: None
Speaker: Rebecca Ballard, JD, Director, Office of Research Integrity, Children’s Mercy Hospitals

2:00 – 3:15 PM EASTERN U.S. TIME

Research Compliance Part 1
Google Calendar
Content Level: Basic-Intermediate
This is the first of two sessions that will provide an overview of compliance issues related to sponsored research.  This session will focus on human subject research, the use and care of animals in research and responsible conduct of research education.
Learning Objecives:
1. Be able to identify compliance issues related to sponsored research.
2. Identify the applicable federal regulations and describe how these regulations apply to research compliance.
Prerequisites: None
Speaker: Ann Mathias, JD, Assistant Vice President, Research Compliance, Carnegie Mellon University

3:45 – 5:00 PM EASTERN U.S. TIME

Research Compliance Part 2
Google Calendar
Content Level: Basic-Intermediate
This is the second of two sessions that will provide an overview of compliance issues related to sponsored research.  This session will focus on financial conflicts of interest, export controls and research misconduct.
Learning Objecives:
1. Be able to identify compliance issues related to sponsored research.
2. Identify the applicable federal regulations and describe how these regulations apply to research compliance.
Prerequisites: None
Speaker: Ann Mathias, JD, Assistance Vice President, Research Compliance, Carnegie Mellon University

 

Tuesday, October 2

9:30 – 10:45 AM EASTERN U.S. TIME

Optimizing Ethical Practice in Research Administration through Positive Leadership
Google Calendar
Content Level: Advanced
Research administrators promote a form of ethics bound by rules, regulations and audit, otherwise known as Ethical Formalism. The tendency evolved through government mandate and laws created in response to watershed events in ethical history, such as the ethically deplorable Tuskegee syphilis study. It was a societal necessity, and through the force of law, ethical formalism now provides the foundation for professional legitimacy for the research administrator. As research administrators, then, we find our choices are limited when it comes to leading positive change in the research environment and we are often viewed as the ‘police’ rather than helping advance the research endeavor. This session will identify ways research administrators can enhance their professional legitimacy not only through following the law, but also by analyzing the concept of moral agency and the virtuous organization and how these concepts contribute to advancing the research endeavor.
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the weaknesses of ethical formalism in research administration and describe ways to enhance ethical practice from a professional and corporate perspective.
2. Describe the issues of moral agency and the virtuous organization by analyzing current research in positive organizational scholarship.
Prerequisites: An expert understanding of the Research Environment and the issues surrounding the Responsible Conduct in Research (RCR).
Speaker: Tim Atkinson, Assistant Provost, Sponsored Programs, University of Central Arkansas

11:15 AM – 12:30 PM EASTERN U.S. TIME

A Hard Look at Research Misconduct
Google Calendar
Content Level:  All Levels
This session will clearly define the concept of ‘research misconduct’, introduce the Office of Research Integrity (ORI), as well as other federal agencies. In a world of tenure, publishing practices, outside funding sources, cultural diversity and competition, this presentation will look at mentoring opportunities to foster an environment for the responsible conduct of research.
Learning Objectives:
1. Identify ‘research misconduct’ as defined by the Office of Research Integrity.
2. Explore the tenants underlying academia and opportunities for mentoring on the responsible conduct of research.
Prerequisites: None
Speaker: Maria Garner, Associate General Counsel, Vanderbilt University

2:00 – 3:15 PM EASTERN U.S. TIME

Rebuilding a Research Ethics Committee
Google Calendar
Content Level: Intermediate
Ethics committees and boards have responded to changes in research management and this review of practice looks at the impact on an Australian committee. The principal ethics committee in Australia’s capital, Canberra, has undergone major revision, based on changes debated in the literature. The consumption of paper is noted: prompt adoption of electronic documentation was successful. Timelines for ethical review differ but 60 days is common: tighter subcommittee timing has helped to reduce delays. Delegated review of low or minimal risk projects offers rapid handling and relieves main committees. Committee or Board structure varies widely, regulations determining minimum size and membership. Australian rules are the most rigorous. Critics write of growing bureaucracy, discrepancy in ethics decisions, and poor applications. Better communications have proved helpful. A national program to overcome problems of multisite research is underway in Australia; ethical review and research governance are separated though these proceed in parallel.
Learning Objectives:
1. List 4 principal causes of delay in ethical review.
2. Describe the main difficulties in ethical review of multisite research and identify solutions for each.
Prerequisites: None
Speaker: John Biggs, Chairman, Australian Capital Territory Health Human Research Ethics Committee, Australia

3:45 – 5:00 PM EASTERN U.S. TIME

Biological Specimens in Industry Sponsored Research
Google Calendar
Content Level:  All Levels
The legal and regulatory requirements associated with the collection, storage and use of biological specimens are becoming increasingly complex.  Compliance requires familiarity with the underlying legal and regulatory landscape associated with informed consent, federal and state privacy requirements, ownership of specimens and intellectual property issues, as they apply to biological specimens.  This session will present an overview of current case law and regulations and trends/recent developments.
Learning Objectives:
1. Understand differences between HHS and FDA Informed Consent requirements and their applicability to biological specimens.
2. Understand the issues surrounding ‘ownership’ of biological specimens under current case law and applicable legislation.
Prerequisites: None
Speaker: Rosemary Farr, JD, Counsel, Reed Smith LLP

 


Register Today!

Registration Closes
Monday, September 24!

Individual Registration:
On-line registration for both days
On-line registration for Monday Morning
On-line registration for Monday Afternoon
On-line registration for Tuesday Morning
On-line registration for Tuesday Afternoon

Group Registrations (must be faxed in):
Fax registration for 1 – 4 attendees
Fax registration for 5 – 9 attendees
Fax registration for 10 + attendees

For a list of all SRA International meetings visit www.srainternational.org

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